Consultations on Nuclear and Radioactive Import and Exports Controls Proposed Regulatory Changes

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The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is asking the public, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders to provide their comments on part II of draft regulatory document REGDOC-2.13.2, Import and Export, version 2. To review and comment on the document, visit the REGDOC-2.13.2 Web page. The deadline for feedback is November 28 2017. Comments submitted, including names and affiliations, are intended to be made public.

Part I of draft REGDOC-2.13.2 sets out the CNSC’s guidance for current and prospective licensees who intend to import or export nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use items (also known as controlled nuclear substances, equipment and information). Part I also identifies a change to the implementation of Canada’s nuclear non-proliferation policy with respect to evaluating export applications of foreign-origin uranium. Part I was approved by the Commission and published on September 2016. For this reason, consultation on part I is now closed.

Part II of draft REGDOC-2.13.2 sets out the CNSC’s guidance for current and prospective licensees who intend to import or export risk-significant radioactive sources (Category 1 and 2 radioactive sources), as set out in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) RS-G-1.9, Categorization of Radioactive Sources. It is part II alone that will be consulted on.

In addition, a copy of the existing schedule to the Nuclear Non-proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations (NNIECR) has been added to draft REGDOC-2.13.2 as appendix E. This schedule will eventually be replaced with an updated version if the currently proposed amendments to the NNIECR are approved and published. The updated version of the schedule previously underwent public consultation as part of the CNSC’s discussion paper DIS-15-01, Proposal to Amend the Nuclear Non-proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations.

Draft REGDOC-2.13.2 also provides information about the CNSC’s import and export control program for licence applications, the licence evaluation process and compliance with regulatory requirements.

The CNSC regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment; to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public.